Blackjack Martingale: The Ultimate Strategy for Winning

Ask any novice player who has read a handful of game strategies which betting method is best to ensure a profit and they will invariably point to the Martingale system. However, if you ask the same question of a seasoned player with years of experience in the field, they will usually say something other than the Martingale system.

There are few issues in the literature on gambling around the world that are more widely discussed than the Martingale system. Originally developed in France in the 18th century, this style of betting is designed for games of chance. Although it can be directly applied to a simple face-to-face or face-to-face guessing game, it can also be adapted for use in casino games that follow a similar betting pattern (i.e. the returns are 50/50) such as blackjack and roulette.

To take this a step further, here is a detailed overview of how the Martingale system works in a casino, first in a blackjack game.

Martingale in action: Blackjack

Basically, the Martingale system forces you to double your previous bet for every lost bet you make. For example, suppose your first bet at the blackjack table is $5 and you lose the hand. At that point, your next bet would be $10.

This sequence continues until you win a hand, so if your second bet loses, you will have to bet $20 on the third hand and so on. Essentially, this strategy forces you to constantly double your bet every time you lose with the prospect that when you eventually win a hand.

Once you win a hand, the mathematics of the system dictates that you will show a profit of one unit. Simply put, one unit is defined as the size of your initial bet. Thus, in this example, after losing three consecutive hands, the player would have to bet $40 on his fourth hand, bringing his overall exposure to $75. After winning that hand, the player receives $80, which would leave him with a profit of $5.

Does Martingale really work?

Although the Martingale system seems like a fantastic way to make money playing blackjack or roulette, it is not a solution to all your gambling problems. In pure mathematical terms, the system is bulletproof, however, in the reality of the gaming world, it is full of problems. The main problem with Martingale is that it requires an extremely large bankroll.

To illustrate this, consider our previous example where $10 was the opening bet. In this situation, you would have to bet $640 as the opening bet after only six losing hands. This is obviously far beyond the finances of many players and the main reason why this betting strategy doesn’t really work in reality

OK, what if you have unlimited bankroll? In this situation, the Martingale system would certainly work; however, it is at this point that the casino rules will make this strategy fail. Every live and online casino will have a maximum betting limit, making it impossible to implement the Martingale system correctly. Simply because you can afford to constantly double your bet until you hit a winner, a table’s betting limits will prevent you from doing so repeatedly and that is what kills your EV (wait).

There is a cost to using Martingale.

The Martingale betting system can only succeed if its main principle is respected: that is, you must continue to double your bets until you win. If this scheme is interrupted at some point or limited by external factors, it falls both in theory and in practice. Therefore, if you are looking for higher profits in blackjack or roulette, you should look beyond this strategy. Although there is some merit in using it in small doses, relying on it as a complete betting system would be a costly mistake and would violate all the bankroll management rules you have set for yourself.

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